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Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts operates on a land that has been a site of human activity for thousands of years. This site was the territory of the UmonHon (Omaha), Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, Missouri, and the Ioway peoples. UmonHon means “upstream,” a name marking the tribe’s settlement location on the banks of the Missouri River. Nebraska’s name is derived from the word “Nibthaska” meaning “atwater” in the UmonHon language. In 1854, the UmonHon tribe was led to believe that they were securing U.S. protection by signing a treaty, giving up the land that now makes up the city of Omaha. Through several broken treaties, the UmonHon have a reservation one hour north of Omaha.
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Upcoming Events

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Benny Leather Photo by Kristen Robert Buell
Virtual @ LOW END | Benny Leather
Thursday, April 22, 2021 8:00–9:00 PM
Joey Fauerso Inside the Spiders Body 2020 Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts026
Tours
Saturday, April 24, 2021 11:00–5:00 PM
Seed of Perpetuity Photo by Kolbeinn Hugi
LOW END
Thursday, April 29, 2021 8:00–9:00 PM
Pamela Z performing at Ars Electronica in Linz Austria Photo by rubra
LOW END
Thursday, May 6, 2021 8:00–9:00 PM

Current Residents

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Untitled Stephanie Germosen
January 20–April 16, 2021
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Bemis Center for
Contemporary Arts

724 S. 12th Street
Omaha, NE 68102

402.341.7130
info@bemiscenter.org

Closed Now
Mon Closed
Tue Closed
Wed 11 am–5 pm
Thu 11 am–9 pm
Fri 11 am–5 pm
Sat 11 am–5 pm
Sun Closed